Celebrating a pulp fiction artist who broke gender barriers

This image provided by the Norman Rockwell Museum shows the oil on canvas painting "Couple with heart branding iron," circa 1940s, by Gloria Stoll Karn. Karn, who had a brief but productive stint as an illustrator of pulp crime and romance magazines during the 1940s, is being celebrated with an exhibition of her works opening Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass. (Gloria Stoll Karn/Norman Rockwell Museum via AP)
In this 1945 photo provided by the Norman Rockwell Museum, artist Gloria Stoll Karn poses in her New York studio. Karn, a pioneering artist, who had a brief but productive stint as an illustrator of pulp crime and romance magazines during the 1940s, is being celebrated with an exhibition of her works opening Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018 at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass. (Norman Rockwell Museum via AP)
This May 2008 photo made by her grandson Shawn Cregan and provided by the Norman Rockwell Museum shows artist Gloria Stoll Karn at her home in Pittsburgh. Karn, a pioneering artist who had a brief but productive stint as an illustrator of pulp crime and romance magazines during the 1940s, is being celebrated with an exhibition of her works opening Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass. (Shawn Cregan/Norman Rockwell Museum via AP)
This image provided by the Norman Rockwell Museum shows the oil on board painting, "Girl and Snowball," circa 1940s, by Gloria Stoll Karn. Karn, who had a brief but productive stint as an illustrator of pulp crime and romance magazines during the 1940s, is being celebrated with an exhibition of her works opening Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass. (Gloria Stoll Karn/Norman Rockwell Museum via AP)
This image provided by the Norman Rockwell Museum shows the watercolor on board painting "Army Soldier and Woman on Bicycle," created in 1944 by Gloria Stoll Karn. Karn, a pioneering artist, who had a brief but productive stint as an illustrator of pulp crime and romance magazines during the 1940s, is being celebrated with an exhibition of her works opening Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Mass. (Gloria Stoll Karn/Norman Rockwell Museum via AP)

BOSTON — A pioneering illustrator for the pulp fiction crime and romance magazines of the 1940s is being celebrated in a new exhibit at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

The now 94-year-old Gloria Stoll Karn was one of the few women artists who did cover illustrations for the popular magazines.

The exhibit that opens Saturday and runs until June features more than 50 originals as well as dozen of magazine clippings, many featuring strapping men and rosy-cheeked young women with ribbons in their hair gazing adoringly into each other's eyes.

The exhibit's curator says the women in Stoll Karn's work had a confidence that can't be seen in illustrations done by men.

Stoll Karn is scheduled to attend the opening.

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