Mexico hopes fish farming can help save endangered porpoise

MEXICO CITY — Mexico hopes fish farming can help weaken the illegal market for the totoaba fish and help save the critically endangered vaquita porpoise, of which less than 30 survive.

Poachers in Mexico have long caught vaquitas in nets set for totoaba, which is itself an endangered species. Totoaba swim bladders are a prized delicacy in China.

Mexico's environment department said Friday it plans to invest in three fish farms to raise 300,000 juvenile totoaba to "control the illegal trafficking" of the species.

At least one company currently raises Totoaba from hatchlings in the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez, the only place both species are found.

Fishing for totoaba is prohibited in the Gulf of California, but the high prices traffickers pay make that hard to enforce.

You may also interested in

US judge: Renowned artist didn't create disputed painting

Aug 24, 2016

A U.S. judge says that a celebrated artist was right when he insisted he didn't paint a work now owned by a retired prison worker

US women's gymnastics team flips over Broadway's 'Hamilton'

Aug 24, 2016

The U.S. women's gymnastics team has flipped over Broadway's "Hamilton," in a night that had athletic gold meeting theatrical gold

Lawyer: Timbuktu residents felt shame after sites destroyed

Aug 24, 2016

By reducing historic mausoleums in Timbuktu to dusty piles of rubble, Islamic extremists desecrated holy sites, leaving residents ashamed and impoverished, a lawyer said Wednesday at the trial of the man accused of leading the destruction

Syok Asia welcomes the generations to witness the beautiful world of art and creativity in Malaysia and the rest of the world.

Contact us: sales@syokasia.com