Mexico hopes fish farming can help save endangered porpoise

MEXICO CITY — Mexico hopes fish farming can help weaken the illegal market for the totoaba fish and help save the critically endangered vaquita porpoise, of which less than 30 survive.

Poachers in Mexico have long caught vaquitas in nets set for totoaba, which is itself an endangered species. Totoaba swim bladders are a prized delicacy in China.

Mexico's environment department said Friday it plans to invest in three fish farms to raise 300,000 juvenile totoaba to "control the illegal trafficking" of the species.

At least one company currently raises Totoaba from hatchlings in the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez, the only place both species are found.

Fishing for totoaba is prohibited in the Gulf of California, but the high prices traffickers pay make that hard to enforce.

You may also interested in

Tokyo prepares for 2020, facing rising costs and new sports

Aug 22, 2016

Tokyo's up as the next Summer Olympics host city, facing rising costs and 5 new sports

US women's gymnastics team flips over Broadway's 'Hamilton'

Aug 24, 2016

The U.S. women's gymnastics team has flipped over Broadway's "Hamilton," in a night that had athletic gold meeting theatrical gold

Farm safety top priority with farm tourism on the rise

Aug 24, 2016

Connecticut officials are joining other states in educating local farmers about how to mitigate public health risks as more people visit their farms

Syok Asia welcomes the generations to witness the beautiful world of art and creativity in Malaysia and the rest of the world.

Contact us: sales@syokasia.com