Mexico hopes fish farming can help save endangered porpoise

MEXICO CITY — Mexico hopes fish farming can help weaken the illegal market for the totoaba fish and help save the critically endangered vaquita porpoise, of which less than 30 survive.

Poachers in Mexico have long caught vaquitas in nets set for totoaba, which is itself an endangered species. Totoaba swim bladders are a prized delicacy in China.

Mexico's environment department said Friday it plans to invest in three fish farms to raise 300,000 juvenile totoaba to "control the illegal trafficking" of the species.

At least one company currently raises Totoaba from hatchlings in the Gulf of California, also known as the Sea of Cortez, the only place both species are found.

Fishing for totoaba is prohibited in the Gulf of California, but the high prices traffickers pay make that hard to enforce.

You may also interested in

Love tears Helen McCrory apart in 'The Deep Blue Sea'

Aug 19, 2016

You might not think there's much overlap between Amy Winehouse and the work of playwright Terence Rattigan, chronicler of upper-crust British stiff upper lips

Kerry heading to Africa for talks on counterterrorism

Aug 20, 2016

Kerry heading to Africa for counterterrorism talks, followed by Saudi visit on Yemen conflict

After Rio, Olympics headed for Asian venues seen as safe

Aug 22, 2016

The next three Olympics are headed for relatively calmer ports of call in Asia following the drama in Russia and Brazil, but challenges remain, especially when it comes to finances and generating enthusiasm at home

Syok Asia welcomes the generations to witness the beautiful world of art and creativity in Malaysia and the rest of the world.

Contact us: sales@syokasia.com